this is for a challenge at another site where we are given an old picture and challenged to make up a story about it


CREDITS; PHOTOS: from Pexels supplied for challenge; by Desi Mendoza at StockSnap; KIT: "Flipbook Fundamentals" - Dawn Inskip; JOURNALING AND SCRIBBLES: by me; FONT: Comic Sans
JOURNALING: Although some musicologists declare that the term "headbangers" came about during the British band Led Zeppelin's premier tour of the U.S. in 1969  when front-row fans at the "Boston Tea Party" venue started banging their heads on the stage in time with the music, there is some (questionable) physical proof that it was during another Massachusetts event some 300 years earlier that musical headbanging actually began.
Gordon Proctor, a would-be heavy metal guitarist with a little know Boston cover band the Witches,  produced this photo during a drunken 1996 press conference after Nine Inch Nails beat out Metallica for the Grammy that year. He claimed it showed his  great, great, "something", grandmother, "Goody Proctor," performing on piano at the Salem witch trial of the first woman accused, Tituba. Tituba, a slave in the home of the Reverend Samuel Parris, cared for the children. It was one of the Parris daughters and a niece who first started accusing women of being witches after they were caught playing a forbidden fortune-telling game.
When it was pointed out to Proctor that both photography and electric lighting didn't come about until two centuries AFTER the trials, he admitted he had faked the "evidence" using his wife as "Goody."  He claimed it was to show what the event WOULD have looked like had paparazzi been around back then.
Proctor reportedly never recovered from the embarrassment and passed away on his 40th birthday on April 1, 1970. A bound copy of his family history produced in 1996 by Dan Taggart, one of the founders of Ancestry.com, shows a "Goody Proctor" of Salem Massachusetts on one of the first branches of Proctor's family tree. JOURNALING: Although some musicologists declare that the term "headbangers" came about during the British band Led Zeppelin's premier tour of the U.S. in 1969  when front-row fans at the "Boston Tea Party" venue started banging their heads on the stage in time with the music, there is some (questionable) physical proof that it was during another Massachusetts event some 300 years earlier that musical headbanging actually began.
Gordon Proctor, a would-be heavy metal guitarist with a little know Boston cover band the Witches,  produced this photo during a drunken 1996 press conference after Nine Inch Nails beat out Metallica for the Grammy that year. He claimed it showed his  great, great, "something", grandmother, "Goody Proctor," performing on piano at the Salem witch trial of the first woman accused, Tituba. Tituba, a slave in the home of the Reverend Samuel Parris, cared for the children. It was one of the Parris daughters and a niece who first started accusing women of being witches after they were caught playing a forbidden fortune-telling game.
When it was pointed out to Proctor that both photography and electric lighting didn't come about until two centuries AFTER the trials, he admitted he had faked the "evidence" using his wife as "Goody."  He claimed it was to show what the event WOULD have looked like had paparazzi been around back then.
Proctor reportedly never recovered from the embarrassment and passed away on his 40th birthday on April 1, 1970. A bound copy of his family history produced in 1996 by Dan Taggart, one of the founders of Ancestry.com, shows a "Goody Proctor" of Salem Massachusetts on one of the first branches of Proctor's family tree.